Congratulations to the curatorial team behind Queering Duke History, an exhibition and oral history project that mirrors our own. (Check out their fancy logo!)

In the words of curator Denzell Faison:

"As the curator of this exhibit, it is my hope that the narrative contained here will bring to light a story that has too often been forgotten or ignored. This project was started in order to refute the prevailing theory that Duke University never actively discriminated against LGBTQ individuals.

"It is my firm belief that engagement with the past is the first step towards meaningful change in the present. This history speaks to the strength and perseverance of generations of queer students at Duke, and while much work remains to be done, this exhibit is a testament of how far we have come.

"While meant to highlight Duke’s queer past and present, this exhibit is only a snapshot of a larger more complex story. The story of LGBTQ life on campus is one that is only recently being rediscovered and celebrated. My hope is that this exhibit will be a catalyst for further scholarship on the struggles of Duke’s LGBTQ population and continued celebration of the contributions of queer individuals at Duke and beyond."

dear-splenda

First pages of Asian Women (1971), a journal produced by students at UC Berkeley, with articles and art submitted by Asian women across the country.

Most of the compilers met in Asian Studies 170, a winter 1971 proseminar designed to discuss the history and roles of Asian women. Confronted with sexism in the Asian movement, and finding that “the white middle-class woman’s liberation movement” was not relevant to their lives, many Asian American women activists in colleges found the need to create venues for their experiences and opinions.

We support documenting marginalized communities in University histories. What a cool find in the Asian American Studies collection at UC Berkeley!

This 1969 ad for gay roommates led to the formation of the first Gay Liberation group at the University of Chicago.
Michal Brody responded to the ad: 
“At that time, I was a brash young dyke in the neighborhood looking for a place to live. I didn’t know about gay liberation or women’s liberation and I didn’t care. Good affordable housing in that area was hard to find, and I was checking all possibilities. Since I fit the description I answered the ad.
“It never occurred to Henry that a woman would respond. He wasn’t thrilled. The existence of lesbians hadn’t really ever occurred to him. He repeated that he wanted a gay roommate. I insisted that I was. It was a great apartment at a great price, and I was tired of looking. He said he’d have to think about it. Several days and no other takers later, he reluctantly offered me the room overlooking the dime store on 53rd Street, and I happily moved in.”
Sources: The Chicago Maroon, October 3, 1969, and Are We There Yet?: A Continuing History of Lavender Woman, A Chicago Lesbian Newspaper, 1971-1976, Iowa City, IA: Aunt Lute Book Company, 1985, p. 3.

This 1969 ad for gay roommates led to the formation of the first Gay Liberation group at the University of Chicago.

Michal Brody responded to the ad: 

“At that time, I was a brash young dyke in the neighborhood looking for a place to live. I didn’t know about gay liberation or women’s liberation and I didn’t care. Good affordable housing in that area was hard to find, and I was checking all possibilities. Since I fit the description I answered the ad.

“It never occurred to Henry that a woman would respond. He wasn’t thrilled. The existence of lesbians hadn’t really ever occurred to him. He repeated that he wanted a gay roommate. I insisted that I was. It was a great apartment at a great price, and I was tired of looking. He said he’d have to think about it. Several days and no other takers later, he reluctantly offered me the room overlooking the dime store on 53rd Street, and I happily moved in.”

Sources: The Chicago Maroon, October 3, 1969, and Are We There Yet?: A Continuing History of Lavender Woman, A Chicago Lesbian Newspaper, 1971-1976, Iowa City, IA: Aunt Lute Book Company, 1985, p. 3.

lazz

lazz:

the syllabus for susan’s first-ever transgender theory course at arizona. she does something i’ve yet to see anyone else do on a syllabus, which is to explain why she’s assigned what she has each week, effectively guiding the class through her own narrative of the field’s emergence. i’ve been waiting for a zealous prof with a fabulist bent. full syllabus shared with permission after the jump.

Check out the full syllabus, via lazz, and read along!

Transgender Studies initiative at the University of Arizona. Left to Right (Front): Paisley Currah, Susan Stryker, Monica Casper, Francisco Galarte; (Back): Eric Plemons, Max Strassfeld, Eva Hayward. Not pictured: TC Tolbert. Photo by Paisley Currah.

What we’re reading: Petra Dierkes-Thrun interviews Susan Stryker, leader of an unprecedented initiative in transgender studies at the University of Arizona, and one of two founding co-editors of the new journal TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly.

Read their conversation [here].

Transgender Studies initiative at the University of Arizona. Left to Right (Front): Paisley Currah, Susan Stryker, Monica Casper, Francisco Galarte; (Back): Eric Plemons, Max Strassfeld, Eva Hayward. Not pictured: TC Tolbert. Photo by Paisley Currah.

What we’re reading: Petra Dierkes-Thrun interviews Susan Stryker, leader of an unprecedented initiative in transgender studies at the University of Arizona, and one of two founding co-editors of the new journal TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly.

Read their conversation [here].